Preventing Hangovers

For all the partygoers out there, there is always one downside to a night on a town the hangover the morning after. However, there are some specific things that you can do to prevent hangovers the next time you go out drinking.

There is one way that you can absolutely prevent getting a hangover a totally infallible cure. Do not drink ever. However, if you are looking for hangover cures, this is probably not an option for you. So, the next best thing is not to drink enough to get drunk. That will also reduce your risk dramatically.

Hangover Damage Control

Beyond this, you have to have some limited understanding on the mechanics of a hangover and what causes you so much pain and suffering. First off, there is dehydration from the alcohols diuretic effects. Next, there is nervous shock. Alcohol is a depressant drug, and you have gotten an overdose, playing havoc with your system. Lastly, there is malnutrition. The diuretic effect of the alcohol has caused you to not only lose fluid, but also a good supply of vitamins and minerals that your body needs to function.

So, a big part of taking care of your hangover is damage control. Getting rest and decreasing stimulation can help. Eating some healthy foods, like fruits and vegetables, can help replenish vitamins and nutrients without playing havoc with your digestion.

Bananas and tomatoes are packed with nutrients and generally easy to eat. Fruit or vegetable juices can also help if you are not up to a solid meal right away. Be wary of greasy, fatty foods, dairy, and anything with caffeine, since these will only upset your bodys systems more.

Hangover Tips

If you cannot avoid drinking to excess, then there are some tips to helping keep the hangover at bay. For instance, stick to one type of alcohol. Mixing beer and wine with stronger liquors can be difficult on your body, since the different strengths of alcohol are processed at different rates. It can also be harder to gauge how much alcohol you are taking in, and you will more than likely feel quite sick the next day.

The clearer your drink of choice, the less likely you will be to get a hangover from it. Also, try to stick to the “top shelf” with your drink choices. A cheap, dark red wine is much more likely to give you a hangover than a more expensive white. Watch out for cordials, dark rum, and other dark liquors as well.

If you like sweet drinks, watch your sugar intake. Too much of these fruity and sweet concoctions will eave you suffering in the morning. While rum and Coke or strawberry margaritas may go down easily at the party, the combination of sugar and alcohol will leave you reeling in the morning. And for most people, daiquiris are not nearly as fun coming back up as they were going down. So watch what you are drinking.

If at all possible, try to pace yourself throughout the evening. Nurse your drinks, or try and have something non-alcoholic in between alcoholic drinks. That will help you to stay hydrated and allow you to feel better in the morning.

Hydration

Drinking a large amount of water and/or fruit juice before, during, and after alcohol consumption is good way to reduce the adverse effects of alcohol and avoid a hangover.

Drinking plenty of water and/or fruit juice reduces the dehydration that is caused when your body has to deal with the alcohol that you have consumed.

As the night wears on, a lot of people drink because they are thirsty, and, if they are only drinking alcohol, then they are making things worse for themselves the next morning. They will likely suffer a more severe hangover.

Eating Before Drinking

Drinking on an empty stomach speeds up the absorption of alcohol, maximizes its effects, and also maximizes the severity of the hangover.

So, a good strategy to avoid hangovers is to avoid drinking on an empty stomach. Eating before and during the consumption of alcohol helps slow down the absorption of alcohol and provides the body with more time to deal with the alcohol. This strategy reduces the adverse effects of alcohol while also helping to reduce the severity of the hangover.